Rare Drafting: Heist Edition

Rare Drafting: Heist Edition

Greetings fellow Spoilers! So as of this reading I have no doubt that most of you have called in sick, locked the doors, and told loved ones to stick it where they would have things stuck because April 10th, my friends, was Holy Heist day.  I, myself, have told my significant other that while I love her, I’m not in Spoils love with her, and even though now it seems like that was a mistake I believe we will look back on this time not as a roadblock in our relationship, but rather the building of the strong foundation that our marriage rests upon.  Plus, I’m sure all will be forgiven when I speak incessantly on the new combos I’ve discovered, but I digress. I want to talk again today about the moment when the planets align and the rare card in the pack is worth drafting on its own merits.  In the previous article, I mentioned cards that could or should direct your drafting following that pack, cards like GGG or Samuel Gristwalter.  But forget those tired Shade and 2nd Edition card; it’s Heist time. The one thing I noticed, and you will too, is that MANY of the rare cards in Heist are very good and worth grabbing.  The bummer being is that they are costed appropriately (I know, right) or they have a high threshold, meaning they will direct your draft, locking you into pulling cards from the same trade in order to best make use of your target threshold – not unlike the previously mentioned cards.  There are, however, three rare cards that I believe...
Spoiler! Ignatius Gloamspike

Spoiler! Ignatius Gloamspike

Greetings fellow Spoilers! Today is an exciting day.  I was given the opportunity to spoil a new card from the upcoming Holy Heist set.  That card, ladies and gentlemen, is… Ignatius Gloamspike! Since we play The Spoils I refuse to look at anything other than the art and flavor first.  So let’s.  This here is a Gloamspike!  That must be exciting for you all.  I know I’m excited.  For those of you that need a brief primer in The Spoils history, let me sort of explain. Way back when, (Seed cycle) the main Arcanist dude was Woadenworm Gloamspike.  You might remember him from his own card in Seed 2, as well as the picture in the background on Ignatius’ card.  See it!? See it there!? Exciting!  Okay.  So, Woadenworm was an advisor to Emperor Padamose and high priest of the Thabbashites.  Basically, he mutinied against everyone, sired the Demon Knights and took a run at Marduun.  That did not go well.  His demon children were defeated and he was exiled to Lugubria.  It’s hard to argue things went well for Padamose though, since he was betrayed six ways to Sunday.  I think the only person that came out on top might have been Elzibeth, but that’s not important here. Anyway, Woadenworm gets sent to Lugubria.  There he fathers the Brothers Gloamspike: Mogdra, Mirgla, and Dogwald.  These brothers discover voidal humor, Mogdra dies of voidal poisoning, Mirgla gets all sad and reclusive, and Dogwald becomes rich and famous.  Dogwald, one of the most powerful Arcanists around, has several children and one of them is… Ignatius!   Ignatius is not all...
Rare Drafting

Rare Drafting

Greetings fellow Spoilers! Over the past few articles we’ve discussed some combos within the Shecond Limited setting, and during said discussions I mentioned a few times that limited play requires singularly strong cards.  So let’s dive into those cards shall we?  I specifically want to discuss drafting strong cards in this article.  Drafting requires much more than just picking out the strongest card in the deck and needs an entire article devoted to even do it a modicum of justice.  So, instead, I am going to narrow my focus towards cards you should grab on their own merits like you’ve opened a fresh pack and haven’t decided anything about anything when it comes to your eventual deck. Today, let’s focus on rare cards.  New and old players alike really like to pull the rare card from a pack.  You paid for a draft; you might as well make your money back, especially if the prize pool is limited.  I completely understand this mentality.  When Seed was new, I was guilty of grabbing a Violence out of my third pack when I had decidedly been drafting banker and rogue, even when it meant passing up a Pilgrimage Auditor or Shadowy Mugger.  This tendency was exacerbated with the addition of Seed 2 because of its bizarre 60/50 common/rare split.  Chances were after several drafts or box purchases you had your fill of Seed 2 commons.  If you are in it to win it though, you should be looking at the strongest card or cards in the pack that will fit in your evolving deck irrespective of rarity. All that having been...
Church of 1337!

Church of 1337!

Greetings fellow Spoilers!  It’s been a while, I know.  Believe you me, I know.  BUT!  Let’s not make a big deal out of it.  Instead, how about we focus on something more fun: combos.  Or, better yet, let’s talk about a very specific combo that we can all enjoy when playing Shecond limited. For those of you that just casually stumbled across The Spoils page, here is a small primer to catch you up.  Shecond is played using cards from only 2nd Edition and Shade of the Devoured Emperor.  2nd Edition is a whopping big set with amazing classic cards and Shade is the new kid on the block with all his shiny new toys (read: rules text), and he’s got a lot of toys. In limited play you are either going to be drafting or playing sealed.  In both these formats you are going to have a limited card pool and deck building becomes more micro than macro, meaning: you are going to need to focus on one or two cards rather than a Rube Goldberg OTK situation or a heavily themed deck (recursion, discard, burn).  Sure, you can have elements of those types of decks, but singularly strong cards and small combos are going to be your bread and butter. Before we get into what I consider to be one of the best cards in second edition I want to quickly touch on a very important part of card gaming in general for the new guys.  Card advantage is how you win in the limited format.  It’s how you win in all formats, but sometimes in constructed...